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Fixing the broken/corrupt Locker Partition on Esxi

Fixing the broken/corrupt Locker Partition on Esxi

Sometimes can occur an esxi corrupted partition that can appear with error mounting vmware tools iso


To resolve this issue, you must connect via ssh to host and than follow the below guide

commands: 
ls -ltrh / | grep store
 vmkfstools -P /vmfs/volumes/5cdce747-375af1f6-b185-0050569674de
 
Output: 
ls -ltrh / | grep store 
lrwxrwxrwx    1 root     root           6 May 13 23:03 locker -> /store lrwxrwxrwx    1 root     root          49 May 16 04:29 store -> /vmfs/volumes/5cdce747-375af1f6-b185-0050569674de 

vmkfstools -P /vmfs/volumes/5cdce747-375af1f6-b185-0050569674de
vfat-0.04 (Raw Major Version: 0) file system spanning 1 partitions.
File system label (if any):
Mode: private
Capacity 299712512 (36586 file blocks * 8192), 299712512 (36586 blocks) avail, max supported file size 0
Disk Block Size: 512/0/0
UUID: 5cdce747-375af1f6-b185-0050569674de
Partitions spanned (on "disks"):
        mpx.vmhba0:C0:T0:L0:8
Is Native Snapshot Capable: NO 

Make a note of the device under the line Partitions spanned (on “disks”):

Note: The :8 on the above result signific that this is partition 8 of the disk
Note: On a default install, the locker/tools iso are always stored to partition 8 of the installed disk/drive.

Format the partition with fat filesystem using the below command: Ensure you DO NOT MISS the partition number

vmkfstools -C vfat /dev/disks/mpx.vmhba0:C0:T0:L0:8
eg: 
vmkfstools -C vfat /dev/disks/mpx.vmhba0:C0:T0:L0:8
create fs deviceName:'/dev/disks/mpx.vmhba0:C0:T0:L0:8', fsShortName:'vfat', fsName:'(null)'
deviceFullPath:/dev/disks/mpx.vmhba0:C0:T0:L0:8 deviceFile:mpx.vmhba0:C0:T0:L0:8
Checking if remote hosts are using this device as a valid file system. This may take a few seconds...
Creating vfat file system on "mpx.vmhba0:C0:T0:L0:8" with blockSize 1048576 and volume label "none".
Successfully created new volume: 5cdcf45e-68f98eec-adb0-0050569674de

Note: If the format fails with the resource in use errors, the host will need a reboot.

re-create the symlink for store:

ln -snf /vmfs/volumes/5cdcf45e-68f98eec-adb0-0050569674de /store

ln -snf /vmfs/volumes/5cdcf45e-68f98eec-adb0-0050569674de /locker

Copy contents of the store partition from a working host, same Esxi build

Intel CPU EVC Matrix (VMware Enhanced vMotion Compatibility)

Intel CPU EVC Matrix (VMware Enhanced vMotion Compatibility)

Intel uses a model named “Tick-Tock” to follow every microarchitectural change with a die shrink. This results in having two EVC baselines for every microarchitecture. I’ve created a small table with a quick overview about EVC Modes with their appropriate CPU Series and Codenames used by Intel to denote their CPUs. I’ve also included additional Codenames that may be used by Intel for special processors. The upcoming Haswell architecture is named, but not yet available or supported by VMware.

 

EVC introduced Baseline µarch aka. CPU Series
L0 vSphere 4.0 Merom Core Conroe
Tigerton
Woodcrest
Clovertown
Kentsfield
30xx Series
32xx Series
51xx Series
53xx Series
72xx Series
73xx Series
L1 Penryn Dunnington
Harpertown
Yorkfield
Wolfdale
31xx Series
33xx Series
52xx Series
54xx Series
74xx Series
L2 Nehalem Nehalem Beckton
Gainestown
Bloomfield
Lynnfield
Clarksfield
34xx Lynnfield
35xx Series
55xx Series
65xx Series
75xx Series
i3-2100 Series
L3 vSphere 4.1 Westmere Gulftown
Clarkdale
Arrandale
i3/i5 Clarkdale
34xx Clarkdale
36xx Series
56xx Series
E7-2800 Series
E7-4800 Series
E7-8800 Seriee
Core i7-620LE
L4 vSphere 5.0 Sandy
Bridge
Sandy
Bridge
E3-1100 Series
E3-1200 Series
E5-1400 Series
E5-1600 Series
E5-2400 Series
E5-2600 Series
E5-4600 Series
L5 vSphere 5.1 Ivy Bridge i3-3200 Series
i7-3500-LE/UE Series
i7-3600-QE Series
Xeon E3-1100-C-v2 Series
Xeon E3-1200-v2 Series
Xeon E5-1400-v2 Series
Xeon E5-1600-v2 Series
Xeon E5-2400-v2 Series
Xeon E5-2600-v2 Series
Xeon E5-4600-v2 Series
Xeon E7-8800-v2 Series
Xeon E7-4800-v2 Series
Xeon E7-2800-v2 Series
L6  vSphere 6.0 Haswell Haswell E3-1200-v3 Series
E5-1400-v3 Series
E5-1600-v3 Series
E5-2400-v3 Series
E5-2600-v3 Series
i3-4300 Series
i5-4500-TE Series
i7-4700-EQ Series
L7  vSphere 6.5 Broadwell
Skylake Skylake

Intel CPU Series EVC Interoperability Matrix

EVC L0
Merom
EVC L1
Penryn
EVC L2
Nehalem
EVC L3
Westmere
EVC L4
Sandy Bridge
EVC L5
Ivy Bridge
Xeon 30xx Series
yes
no
no
no
no
no
Xeon 32xx Series
yes
no
no
no
no
no
Xeon 51xx Series
yes
no
no
no
no
no
Xeon 53xx Series
yes
no
no
no
no
no
Xeon 72xx Series
yes
no
no
no
no
no
Xeon 73xx Series
yes
no
no
no
no
no
Xeon 31xx Series
yes
yes
no
no
no
no
Xeon 33xx Series
yes
yes
no
no
no
no
Xeon 52xx Series
yes
yes
no
no
no
no
Xeon 54xx Series
yes
yes
no
no
no
no
Xeon 74xx Series
yes
yes
no
no
no
no
Xeon 34xx Lynnfield Series
yes
yes
yes
no
no
no
Xeon 35xx Series
yes
yes
yes
no
no
no
Xeon 55xx Series
yes
yes
yes
no
no
no
Xeon 65xx Series
yes
yes
yes
no
no
no
Xeon 75xx Series
yes
yes
yes
no
no
no
i3-2100 Series
yes
yes
yes
no
no
no
i3/i5 Clarkdale Series
yes
yes
yes
yes
no
no
Xeon 34xx Clarkdale Series
yes
yes
yes
yes
no
no
Xeon 36xx Series
yes
yes
yes
yes
no
no
Xeon 56xx Series
yes
yes
yes
yes
no
no
Xeon E7-2800 Series
yes
yes
yes
yes
no
no
Xeon E7-4800 Series
yes
yes
yes
yes
no
no
Xeon E7-8800 Series
yes
yes
yes
yes
no
no
Core i7-620LE
yes
yes
yes
yes
no
no
Xeon E3-1100 Series
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
no
Xeon E3-1200 Series
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
no
Xeon E5-1400 Series
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
no
Xeon E5-1600 Series
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
no
Xeon E5-2400 Series
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
no
Xeon E5-2600 Series
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
no
Xeon E5-4600 Series
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
no
i7-3600-QE
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
Xeon E3-1100-C-v2 Series
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
Xeon E3-1200-v2 Series
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
Xeon E5-1400-v2 Series
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
Xeon E5-2400-v2 Series
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
Xeon E5-2600-v2 Series
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
Xeon E3-1200-v3 Series*
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
i3-4300 Series*
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
i5-4500-TE Series*
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
i7-4700-EQ Series*
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
*Haswell CPU EVC L0
Merom
EVC L1
Penryn
EVC L2
Nehalem
EVC L3
Westmere
EVC L4
Sandy Bridge
EVC L5
Ivy Bridge

Detailed CPU List

EVC Baseline CPU List
L0 Merom 3040, 3050, 3050, 3060, 3065, 3070, 5110, 5113, 5120, 5128, 5130, 5133, 5138, 5140, 5148, 5150, 5160, E5310, E5320, E5335, E5345, E7210, E7220, E7310, E7320, E7330, E7340, L5310, L5318, L5320, L5335, L7345, X3210, X3220, X3230, X5355, X5365, X7350
L1 Penryn E3110, E3120, E3120, E5205, E5220, E5405, E5410, E5420, E5430, E5440, E5450, E5462, E5472, E7420, E7430, E7440, E7450, L3110, L3360, L5215, L5240, L5410, L5420, L5430, L7445, L7455, X3320, X3330, X3350, X3360, X3370, X3380, X5260, X5270, X5272, X5450, X5460, X5470, X5472, X5482, X5492, X7460
L2 Nehalem E5502, E5503, E5503, E5504, E5506, E5507, E5520, E5530, E5540, E6510, E6540, E7520, E7530, E7540, L3426, L5506, L5520, L5530, L7545, L7555, W3520, W3530, W3540, W3550, W3565, W3570, W3580, W5580, W5590, X3430, X3440, X3450, X3460, X3470, X3480, X5550, X5560, X5570, X6550, X7542, X7550, X7560
L3 Westmere X5690, X5687, X5680, X5677, X5675, X5672, X5670, X5667, X5660, X5650, X5647, L5640, L5638, L5630, L5618, L5609, E5649, E5645, E5640, E5630, E5620, E5607, E5606, E5603, W3680, W3670, E7-8830, E7-8837, E7-8850, E7-8860, E7-8867L, E7-8870, E7-4807, E7-4820, E7-4830, E7-4850, E7-4860, E7-4870, E7-2803, E7-2820, E7-2830, E7-2850, E7-2860, E7-2870
L4 Sandy Bridge E3-1220, E3-1220L, E3-1225, E3-1230, E3-1235, E3-1240, E3-1245, E3-1260L, E3-1270, E3-1275, E3-1280, E3-1290, E5-1428L, E5-1620, E5-1650, E5-1660, E5-2403, E5-2407, E5-2418L, E5-2420, E5-2428L, E5-2430, E5-2430L, E5-2440, E5-2448L, E5-2450, E5-2450L, E5-2470, E5-2603, E5-2609, E5-2620, E5-2630, E5-2630L, E5-2637, E5-2640, E5-2643, E5-2648L, E5-2650, E5-2650L, E5-2658, E5-2660, E5-2665, E5-2667, E5-2670, E5-2680, E5-2687W, E5-2690, E5-4603, E5-4607, E5-4610, E5-4617, E5-4620, E5-4640, E5-4650, E5-4650L, G440, G460, G465, G470, G530, G530T, G540, G540T, G550, G550T, G555, G620, G620T, G622, G630, G630T, G632, G640, G640T, G645, G645T, G840, G850, G860, G860T, G870, i3-2100, i3-2100T, i3-2102, i3-2105, i3-2120, i3-2120T, i3-2125, i3-2130, i3-2310E, i3-2310M, i3-2312M, i3-2328M, i3-2330E, i3-2330M, i3-2340UE, i3-2348M, i3-2350M, i3-2357M, i3-2365M, i3-2367M, i3-2370M, i3-2375M, i3-2377M, i5-2300, i5-2310, i5-2320, i5-2380P, i5-2390T, i5-2400, i5-2400S, i5-2405S, i5-2410M, i5-2430M, i5-2435M, i5-2450M, i5-2450P, i5-2467M, i5-2500, i5-2500K, i5-2500S, i5-2500T, i5-2510E, i5-2515E, i5-2520M, i5-2537M, i5-2540M, i5-2550K, i5-2557M, i7-2600, i7-2600K, i7-2600S, i7-2610UE, i7-2617M, i7-2620M, i7-2629M, i7-2630QM, i7-2635QM, i7-2637M, i7-2640M, i7-2649M, i7-2655LE, i7-2657M, i7-2670QM, i7-2675QM, i7-2677M, i7-2700K, i7-2710QE, i7-2715QE, i7-2720QM, i7-2760QM, i7-2820QM, i7-2860QM, i7-2920XM, i7-2960XM, i7-3820, i7-3930K, i7-3960X, i7-3970X, 807UE, 827E, 847E, B710, B720, B800, B810, B810E, B815, B820, B830, B840, B940, B950, B960, B970, B980
L5 Ivy Bridge E3-1220LV2, E3-1220V2, E3-1225V2, E3-1230V2, E3-1240V2, E3-1245V2, E3-1265LV2, E3-1270V2, E3-1275V2, E3-1280V2, E3-1290V2, E5-1428LV2, E5-1620V2, E5-1650V2, E5-1660V2, E5-2403V2, E5-2407V2, E5-2418LV2, E5-2420V2, E5-2428LV2, E5-2430LV2, E5-2430V2, E5-2440V2, E5-2448LV2, E5-2450LV2, E5-2450V2, E5-2470V2, E5-2603V2, E5-2609V2, E5-2618LV2, E5-2620V2, E5-2628LV2, E5-2630LV2, E5-2630V2, E5-2637V2, E5-2640V2, E5-2643V2, E5-2648LV2, E5-2650LV2, E5-2650V2, E5-2658V2, E5-2660V2, E5-2667V2, E5-2670V2, E5-2680V2, E5-2687WV2, E5-2690V2, E5-2695V2, E5-2697V2, E5-4603V2, E5-4607V2, E5-4610V2, E5-4620V2, E5-4624LV2, E5-4627V2, E5-4640V2, E5-4650V2, E5-4657LV2, E7-2850V2, E7-2870V2, E7-2880V2, E7-2890V2, E7-4809V2, E7-4820V2, E7-4830V2, E7-4850V2, E7-4860V2, E7-4870V2, E7-4880V2, E7-4890V2, E7-8850V2, E7-8857V2, E7-8870V2, E7-8880LV2, E7-8880V2, E7-8890V2, E7-8891V2, E7-8893V2, G1610, G1610T, G1620, G1620T, G1630, G2010, G2020, G2020T, G2030, G2030T, G2100T, G2120, G2120T, G2130, G2140, i3-3110M, i3-3120M, i3-3120ME, i3-3130M, i3-3210, i3-3217U, i3-3217UE, i3-3220, i3-3220T, i3-3225, i3-3227U, i3-3229Y, i3-3240, i3-3240T, i3-3245, i3-3250, i3-3250T, i5-3210M, i5-3210M, i5-3230M, i5-3230M, i5-3317U, i5-3320M, i5-3330, i5-3330S, i5-3337U, i5-3339Y, i5-3340, i5-3340M, i5-3340S, i5-3350P, i5-3360M, i5-3380M, i5-3427U, i5-3437U, i5-3439Y, i5-3450, i5-3450S, i5-3470, i5-3470S, i5-3470T, i5-3475S, i5-3550, i5-3550S, i5-3570, i5-3570K, i5-3570S, i5-3570T, i5-3610ME, i7-3517U, i7-3517UE, i7-3520M, i7-3537U, i7-3540M, i7-3555LE, i7-3610QE, i7-3610QM, i7-3612QE, i7-3612QM, i7-3612QM, i7-3615QE, i7-3615QM, i7-3630QM, i7-3632QM, i7-3632QM, i7-3635QM, i7-3667U, i7-3687U, i7-3689Y, i7-3720QM, i7-3740QM, i7-3770, i7-3770K, i7-3770S, i7-3770T, i7-3820QM, i7-3840QM, i7-3920XM, i7-3940XM, i7-4820K, i7-4930K, i7-4960X, 1000M, 1005M, 1007U, 1017U, 1019Y, 1020E, 1020M, 1037U, 1047UE, 1405V2, 2020M, 2030M, 2117U, 2127U, 2129Y, 927UE, A1018
L6 Haswell E3-1220 v3, E3-1220LV3, E3-1225V3, E3-1226V3, E3-1230 v3, E3-1230Lv3, E3-1231V3, E3-1240 v3, E3-1240LV3, E3-1241V3, E3-1245 v3, E3-1246V3, E3-1265Lv3, E3-1268LV3, E3-1270 v3, E3-1271V3, E3-1275 v3, E3-1275LV3, E3-1276V3, E3-1280 v3, E3-1281V3, E3-1285 v3, E3-1285Lv3, E3-1286LV3, E3-1286V3, E5-1428LV3, E5-1620V3, E5-1630V3, E5-1650V3, E5-1660V3, E5-1680V3, E5-2408LV3, E5-2418LV3, E5-2428LV3, E5-2438LV3, E5-2603V3, E5-2608LV3, E5-2609V3, E5-2618LV3, E5-2620V3, E5-2623V3, E5-2628LV3, E5-2630LV3, E5-2630V3, E5-2637V3, E5-2640V3, E5-2643V3, E5-2648LV3, E5-2650LV3, E5-2650V3, E5-2658AV3, E5-2658V3, E5-2660V3, E5-2667V3, E5-2670V3, E5-2680V3, E5-2683V3, E5-2687WV3, E5-2690V3, E5-2695V3, E5-2697V3, E5-2698V3, E5-2699V3, G1820, G1820T, G1820TE, G1830, G1840, G1840T, G1850, G3220, G3220T, G3240, G3240T, G3250, G3250T, G3258, G3320TE, G3420, G3420T, G3430, G3440, G3440T, G3450, G3450T, G3460, i3-4000M, i3-4005U, i3-4010U, i3-4010Y, i3-4012Y, i3-4020Y, i3-4025U, i3-4030U, i3-4030Y, i3-4100E, i3-4100M, i3-4100U, i3-4102E, i3-4110E, i3-4110M, i3-4112E, i3-4120U, i3-4130, i3-4130T, i3-4150, i3-4150T, i3-4158U, i3-4160, i3-4160T, i3-4330, i3-4330T, i3-4330TE, i3-4340, i3-4340TE, i3-4350, i3-4350T, i3-4360, i3-4360T, i3-4370, i5-4200H, i5-4200M, i5-4200U, i5-4200Y, i5-4202Y, i5-4210H, i5-4210M, i5-4210U, i5-4210Y, i5-4220Y, i5-4250U, i5-4258U, i5-4260U, i5-4278U, i5-4288U, i5-4300M, i5-4300U, i5-4300Y, i5-4302Y, i5-4308U, i5-4310M, i5-4310U, i5-4330M, i5-4340M, i5-4350U, i5-4360U, i5-4400E, i5-4402E, i5-4402EC, i5-4410E, i5-4422E, i5-4430, i5-4430S, i5-4440, i5-4440S, i5-4460, i5-4460S, i5-4460T, i5-4570, i5-4570S, i5-4570T, i5-4570TE, i5-4590, i5-4590S, i5-4590T, i5-4670, i5-4670K, i5-4670S, i5-4670T, i5-4690, i5-4690S, i5-4690T, i7-4500U, i7-4510U, i7-4550U, i7-4558U, i7-4578U, i7-4600M, i7-4600U, i7-4610M, i7-4610Y, i7-4650U, i7-4700EC, i7-4700EQ, i7-4700HQ, i7-4700MQ, i7-4702EC, i7-4702HQ, i7-4702MQ, i7-4710HQ, i7-4710MQ, i7-4712HQ, i7-4712MQ, i7-4720HQ, i7-4722HQ, i7-4765T, i7-4770, i7-4770K, i7-4770S, i7-4770T, i7-4770TE, i7-4771, i7-4785T, i7-4790, i7-4790S, i7-4790T, i7-4800MQ, i7-4810MQ, i7-4900MQ, i7-4910MQ, i7-4930MX, i7-4940MX, i7-5820K, i7-5930K, i7-5960X, 2000E, 2002E, 2950M, 2955U, 2957U, 2961Y, 2970M, 2980U, 2981U, 3550M, 3556U, 3558U, 3560M, 3560Y, 3561Y
? Broadwell i7-5557U, i7-5550U, i7-5500U, i7-5650U, i7-5600U, i5-5287U, i5-5257U, i5-5250U, i5-5200U, i5-5350U, i5-5300U, i3-5157U, i3-5010U, i3-5005U, 3805U, 3755U, 3205U, 5Y71, 5Y70, 5Y51, 5Y31, 5Y10c, 5Y10a, 5Y10
vCenter Server Appliance 5.5 root account locked out after password expiration

vCenter Server Appliance 5.5 root account locked out after password expiration

Symptoms

  • You are unable to log into the root account for the vCenter Server Appliance (vCSA).
  • The root account for the vCSA is locked.

Purpose

This article provides instructions on preventing the forced lockout of the root account and on unlocking a locked root account.

Cause

The 5.5 release of the vCenter Server Appliance (vCSA) enforces local account password expiration after 90 days by default. This policy locks out the root account when the password expiration date is reached.

Resolution

This behavior affects vCenter Server Appliance 5.5.

Prevent forced lockout when the root account is still active

If the root account is still accessible through the vCSA console or via the secure shell (SSH), you can prevent this issue from occurring by modifying the /etc/cron.daily/pass-expiration script.

To prevent the forced lockout when the root account is still active:

  1. Log in to the vCSA as the root user.
  2. Open the /etc/cron.daily/pass-expiration script in a text editor.
  3. Replace the commands at the bottom of the script to replace the forced lockout with a forced password change:
    1. Delete these commands:# disable the password if it’s time and not already done.
      # don’t rely on the pam account facility. prepend an x in the shadow file.
      if [ $TODAY -ge $DEADLINE ] && ! grep -q ‘root:x’ $SHADOW; then
      sed -e ‘s/^root:\(.*\)/root:x\1/’ $SHADOW -i
      fi
    2. Enter these commands:# force a password change for root if we’ve reached the password expiration date.
      # pam.unix2 doesn’t do this the way we would like, so we do this instead.
      if [ $TODAY -ge $DEADLINE ]; then
      chage –d 0 root
      fi
  4. Save and close the file.

Unlocking a locked out root account

If the root account is not accessible via the console, the secure shell, and the Virtual Appliance Management Interface (VAMI), the root account has been inactivated due to password expiration. To reactivate the root account, the vCSA must be rebooted and the kernel option modified in the GRUB bootloader to obtain a root shell.

To reactivate the root account:

  1. Reboot the vCSA using the vSphere Client.
  2. When the GRUB bootloader appears, press the spacebar to disable autoboot.Note: If the time between when you power on the virtual machine and when it exits the BIOS or EFI and launches the guest operating system is too short, you can adjust the delay. For more information, see Delay the Boot Sequence in the vSphere Client in the vSphere Single Host Management guide.
  3. Type p to access the appliance boot options.
  4. Enter the GRUB password.Note:
    • If the vCSA was deployed without editing the root password in the Virtual Appliance Management Interface (VAMI), the default GRUB password is vmware.
    • If the vCSA root password was reset using the VAMI, then the GRUB password is the password last set in the VAMI for the root account.
  5. Use the arrow keys to highlight VMware vCenter Server Appliance and type e to edit the boot commands.
  6. Scroll to the second line displaying the kernel boot parameters.
  7. Type e to edit the boot command.
  8. Append init=/bin/bash to the kernel boot options.
  9. Press Enter. The GRUB menu reappears.
  10. Type b to start the boot process. The system boots to a shell.
  11. Reset the root password by running the passwd root command.
  12. Restart the appliance by running the reboot command.
  13. Important: Follow the instructions in the Prevent forced lockout when the root account is still active section of this article to prevent future root account lock out and retain password expiration functionality.

Additional Information

The vCSA allows you to establish your own password expiration and warning email policies by using the Admin tab of the Virtual Appliance Management Interface (VAMI).

By default, the password expiration on the local root account in the vCSA is set to 90 days after the password has been changed. This typically occurs at first boot. If the password is not changed on installation, there is a 90-day period before expiration.

Email addresses configured in the Admin tab in the VAMI (https://IP_address:5480 or https://VAMI_host_name:5480) receive email notifications each day for seven days prior to password expiration. The email settings, such as relay SMTP server, are configured through the vSphere Client in the vCenter Server mail settings.

2gbsparse doesn’t work on ESXi 5.1

2gbsparse doesn’t work on ESXi 5.1

2gbsparse does work, but you’ll need to enable a VMkernel module (looks like it’s disabled in 5.1 by default) but there’s also mention of this in vSphere 5.1 release notes

 

# Load multiextent module

esxcli system module load -m multiextent

Adaptec 3805 CIM for ESXi5

Adaptec 3805 CIM for ESXi5

Install CIM provider 7.30 attached (downloaded from Adaptec web site) cim_vmware_v7_30_18837
esxcli software vib install -f -v file:/vmfs/volume/datastore1/filename.vib
Open ESXi firewall to CIM provider port

Create symbolic link on esxi
ln -s /dev/aac0 /dev/aac

I have not yet checked what happens on esxi reboot if link is lost (I think)

Updating ESXi 5 – Single use esxcli

Updating ESXi 5 – Single use esxcli

01: Make sure you have the vMA 5.0 or the vCLI installed and configured or that you have ESXi Shell access on the ESXi 5 host.

02: Download the patch bundle directly from VMware Support. This download will be .zip file. Do not extract it.

03: Upload the .zip file to a datastore that is accessible on the ESXi host you wish to update. The syntax below will use /vmfs/volumes/datastore1, and you may need to adjust as necessary. Note that the .zip file is uploaded to the ESXi host.

Note: In the examples below, the syntax is specific for the vMA. Adjust accordingly, if you are using another approach.

04: Obtain local console access to the vMA and login with the vi-admin account.

05. To determine if the host needs to be placed in maintenance mode, issue the following command:

esxcli –server=10.10.10.10 –username=root software sources vib get -d /vmfs/volumes/datastore1/ESXi500-201109001.zip | grep “Maintenance Mode Required: True”

06. If grep returns “Maintenance Mode Required: True” results, then issue the following command to place the host in maintenance mode:

vicfg-hostops –server 10.10.10.10 –operation enter

07. Verify that the host is in maintenance mode, by issuing the following command:

vicfg-hostops –server=10.10.10.10 –operation info

Note: You could also use the vSphere Client to put the ESXi 5 host in maintenance mode.

08. To verify which VIBs are already installed on the ESXi 5 host, issue the following command:

esxcli –server=10.10.10.10 –username=root software vib list | more
09. To find out which VIBs are available in the depot (the downloaded .zip file), issue the following command:

esxcli –server=10.10.10.10 –username=root software sources vib list –depot=/vmfs/volumes/datastore1/ESXi500-201109001.zip | more
10. To update the ESXi 5 host with the VIBs included in the depot, issue the following command:

esxcli –server=10.10.10.10 –username=root software vib update –depot=/vmfs/volumes/datastore1/ESXi500-201109001.zip

11. When the update is complete, verify the information presented. If prompted, reboot the ESXi 5 host by issuing the following command:

vicfg-hostops –server 10.10.10.10 –operation reboot
12. Verify the patch bundle was installed, by issuing the following command:

esxcli –server=10.10.10.10 –username=root software vib list | more

13. If applicable, take the ESXi 5 host out of maintenance mode using the vSphere Client or with the following command:

vicfg-hostops –server 10.10.10.10 –operation exit

Sun StorageTek 2540 and ESX troubleshooting

Sun StorageTek 2540 and ESX troubleshooting

We experienced a few issues with the StorageTek 2540 array that forms the core of our SAN recently. The symptom was that the array flagged itself as being in a degraded state and that one or more volumes were not assigned to the preferred controller.

 

The first step was to upgrade the SAN firmware and Common Array Manager (CAM) software to the latest release. Despite this, we observed the problem again. Further digging into the problem found that the failover was happening when we performed a LUN rescan under VMware ESX.

 

My previous understanding was that there were essentially two types of arrays: active/active and active/passive. In the active/active configuration, both controllers in an array can service I/O requests to a specific volume concurrently. In an active/passive configuration, one [active] controller handles the I/O with the second [passive] controller sitting idle, only servicing I/O if the active controller fails.

 

I understood the StorageTek 2540 to be an active/passive array; it is only possible to assign a volume to one controller at any time. However, in order to improve the throughput of the array, different volumes can be assigned to different controllers. For example, a volume “VOL1” might be assigned to controller A as its active controller and to controller B for its passive controller, while volume “VOL2” might be assigned to controller B as its active controller and controller A as its passive controller.

 

It turns out that things are more subtle than this; there is a third type of array configuration: asymmetric.

 

The asymmetric configuration follows the active/passive model in that only one controller is servicing I/O for a specific volume at any time, but extends this by allowing I/O operations to be received by the second controller. If this happens, the array will automatically failover the volume to the second controller to service the request. This process is called Automatic Volume Transfer (AVT). If the first controller then receives I/O operations, the AVT moves the volume back.

 

Yes, this could cause some flapping between controllers. It can also cause I/O stalls as the controllers fail across.

 

Some of the array initiator types (such as Solaris with Traffic Manager (aka MPxIO)) disable AVT, others, including the Linux initiator that we’ve used on our VMware hosts, have AVT enabled.

 

So the problem we’re having appears to be caused by the array failing over a volume to its second controller. But why is it doing this? The only configuration I had performed on the ESX side was to ensure the multi-pathing option was set to Most Recently Used (MRU); the correct setting for active/passive arrays. What appears to have happened is that when booting, the ESX servers are not mapping to a consistent path. Out of our five ESX servers, three were setting one controller as active, while the other two servers were setting the second controller as active. Presumably, when one of the hosts (that has the wrong active path) performs a scan, the request is sent to the failover controller which invokes AVT and fails over the volume.

 

How to fix?

 There are two methods to change the disk array NVSRAM settings. One is to use the SANtricity Storage Manager, the other is to use the Common Array Manager (CAM). Both require the array controllers to be rebooted to make the new settings active.

The following is the script for CAM (Windows version only).  
  1. On the CAM server, change directories to the CAM directory. The default location is Program FilesSUNCommon Array ManagerComponentfmsbin .
  2. Ensure the disk array for which the NVSRAM settings need to be updated is already added to the CAM configuration.
  3. Create a .bat file. To create a .bat file, run:  < filename>.bat <CAM arrayname>
      

  4. Copy the following lines into the newly created .bat file:
call service -d %1 -c read -q nvsram region=0xf2 host=0x06
call service -d %1 -c set -q nvsram region=0xf2 offset=0x12 value=0x01 host=0x06
call service -d %1 -c set -q nvsram region=0xf2 offset=0x13 value=0x00 host=0x06
call service -d %1 -c set -q nvsram region=0xf2 offset=0x24 value=0x00 host=0x06
call service -d %1 -c set -q nvsram region=0xf2 offset=0x25 value=0x00 host=0x06
call service -d %1 -c read -q nvsram region=0xf2 host=0x06
cls
echo “The %1 controllers will need to be rebooted for changes to take effect!”Check the output between the two HEX dumps at offsets 0x12, 0x13, 0x24 and 0x25 for any changes. Not all bytes change for each array type.

The following is the procedure from within a Solaris OS